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2016 University of Washington Commencement Ceremony

2016 University of Washington Commencement Ceremony


Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the University
of Washington 141st commencement ceremony honoring the graduating class of 2016. [music]>>ANNOUNCER: Please welcome the University faculty, led by the Commencement Marshals,
and the winners of the 2016 Awards of Excellence.>>ANNOUNCER: Now entering the stadium are
candidates for the various Doctoral and Professional degrees.
Carrying the gonfalons for the Graduate School are Monica De La Torre on the north and Nicole
Robert on the south. Each is receiving a Doctor of Philosophy in Feminist Studies. On the north, carrying the gonfalon for the School of Pharmacy, is Ismael Festus Simekha.
On the north, carrying the gonfalon for the School of Pharmacy, is Ismael Festus Simekha.
Mr. Simekha is receiving a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. On the south, carrying the gonfalon for the School of Law, is Juliya Ziskina. Ms. Ziskina
is receiving a Juris Doctor degree.>>ANNOUNCER: Candidates for the various Master’s
degrees are now entering the stadium. Carrying the gonfalons for the Graduate School
are Preston Tyler Albertine on the north and Christopher Grant Montoya on the south.
Mr. Albertine is receiving a Master of Arts in French Studies.
Mr. Montoya is receiving a Master of Fine Arts in Dance. Also on the north, carrying the gonfalon for the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance,
is Corey Dahl. Mr. Dahl is graduating with a Master of Public Administration.
Also on the south, carrying the gonfalon for the School of Dentistry, are gonfaloniers
Frederica Miako and Keegan Waldo. Ms. Mackert and Mr. Waldo are both graduating
with a Doctor of Dental Surgery.>>ANNOUNCER: Ladies and Gentlemen, candidates
for the bachelor’s degrees from the College of Arts and Sciences are now entering the
stadium. Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Design, Bachelor
of Fine Arts, and Bachelor of Music candidates are on the north. Bachelor of Science in Biology
candidates are on the north. All other Bachelor of Science candidates enter
on the south.>>ANNOUNCER: On the NORTH, carrying the gonfalon
for the College of Arts and Sciences, is Simon Tran, who is graduating with a Bachelor of
Arts in Comparative History.>>ANNOUNCER: On the south carrying the gonfalon from the College
of Arts and Sciences is Reina
Alicia Kluender who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Psychology.>>ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, on the south side of the stadium, please welcome
bachelor’s candidates from the College of Education, led by gonfaloniere Lorena Isabel
Guillen. Ms. Guillen is receiving a Doctor of Philosophy
in Curriculum & Instruction: Teacher Education.>>ANNOUNCER: Candidates from the College of Arts and Sciences continue to enter on the north and south. Carrying the gonfalon on the north is Hannah Louise Schwendemen, who is receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology.>>ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome bachelor’s candidates from the College of Education, led by gonfaloniere Lorena Isabel Guillen. Ms. Guillen is receiving a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum & Instruction: Teacher Education.>>ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, entering
on the south side of the stadium, please welcome the bachelor’s candidates from the College
of Engineering, led by gonfalonieres Ian Andrews and Thao Nguyen.
Mr. Andrews is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering.
Ms. Nguyen is graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering.>>ANNOUNCER: Candidates from the College of Arts and Sciences continue to enter from the north, led by gonfaloniere Hal Schreive, who is receiving a Bachelor of Arts in History.>>ANNOUNCER: Now entering on the south are bachelor candidates from the College of the
Environment. Carrying the gonfalon is Nirupam Jordan Nigam,
who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.>>ANNOUNCER: Bachelor candidates from the Information School are now entering the stadium
on the south. The Information School gonfalon is carried
by Hiram Munn, who is graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Informatics.>>ANNOUNCER: Bachelor candidates from the Michael G. Foster School of Business are now
entering the stadium on the south, led by gonfalonieres Carlos Barrios and Ellie Phillips.
Mr. Barrios is graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration Finance and Entrepreneurship. Ms. Phillips
is receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration (Marketing).>>ANNOUNCER: Candidates receiving Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees from
the College of Arts and Sciences are now entering from the north, led by gonfaloniere Erika
Lauren Mann, who is receiving a Bachelor of Arts in English Language and Literature.>>ANNOUNCER: Bachelor candidates the School of Nursing and the School of Medicine are
now entering the stadium on the south. The School of Nursing is led by gonfalonier
Alexandra Zammit Rubel, who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Nursing.
Carrying the gonfalon for the School of Medicine is Moonlight Bui.
Ms. Bui is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Science.>>ANNOUNCER: Welcome now the bachelor candidates from the College of Built Environments. They
are led by gonfaloniere Ethan Buchan, who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Construction
Management.>>ANNOUNCER: The final groups of bachelor
candidates entering the stadium on the south are from the School of Public Health and the
School of Social Work. Carrying the gonfalon for the School of Public
Health is Luke Nishiko, who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Health Informatics
& Health Information Management. The School of Social Work candidates are led
by gonfaloniere Joseph Andrew Herbert, who is receiving a Master of Social Work.>>ANNOUNCER: Candidates receiving Bachelor of Science degrees are now entering from the
north, led by gonfaloniere John Thomas Gebert, who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in
Neurobiology. Ladies and gentlemen,
Members of the Deans and President’s parties are about to enter the stadium. Will all graduates
please take their seats. Once again, ladies and gentlemen, the members
of the deans and president’s parties are about to enter the stadium. Will all graduates please
take their seats. And now, please turn your attention to the
southwest corner of the stadium and welcome the procession of
deans of the University’s sixteen schools and colleges.>>ANNOUNCER: The academic procession concludes with the entrance to the stadium of the University of Washington Regents, President, and Vice Presidents, led by Professor of Architecture
and Urban Design and Planning and University Marshal Sharon E. Sutton.
Will all graduates please remain standing at your seats.>>The commencement exercises of the University of Washington will be opened with the presentation
of the colors by the joint ROTC color guard and the singing of the ‘Star Spangled Banner’
by Michelle Mary Bretl. Ms. Bretl is graduating today with a Bachelor
of Music in Voice and a Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences: Communication
Disorders. The audience will please rise. � OH SAY CAN YOU SEE BY THE DAWN’S EARLY LIGHT ��
� WHAT SO PROUDLY WE HAILED AT THE TWILIGHT’S LAST GLEAMING ��
� WHOSE BROAD STRIPES AND BRIGHT STARS THROUGH THE PERILOUS FIGHT
� O’ER THE RAMPARTS WE WATCHED WERE SO GALLANTLY STREAMING ��
� AND THE ROCKET’S RED GLARE �� � THE BOMBS BURSTING IN AIR ��
� GAVE PROOF THROUGH THE NIGHT THAT OUR FLAG WAS STILL THERE ��
� OH, SAY DOES THAT STAR SPANGLED BANNER YET WAVE ��
� O’ER THE LAND OF THE FREE AND THE HOME OF THE BRAVE ��
>>Please be seated.>>It is now my pleasure to present to you
the President of the University of Washington, Ana Mari Cauce, who will preside over today’s
exercises. [ Applause ].>>Welcome to the one hundred fortyfirst commencement
ceremony of the University of Washington. [ Applause ]. Commencement ceremonies are an expression
of academic traditions going back hundreds of years, and they symbolize some of the most
fundamental values of our civilization, most particularly, the pursuit of truth, the preservation
of freedom. These ceremonies are also festive, celebratiions,
as the name suggests, not an end, but a commencement of new activities and challenges in the lives
of the graduates. Just a few years ago we welcomed you to the
University at Freshman Convocation in front of the same four columns that you see standing
behind me. This is all that remains of the original University
that opened in 1861. At that convocation we told you we would see
you in front of these same columns when you graduated.
Today that may seem like a lifetime ago, or maybe just yesterday or maybe a little bit
of both. But here you are! You made it!
I am truly honored to be the first to formally congratulate the degree and award recipients
and to welcome all of you to this fabulous ceremony.
[ Applause ]. The splendid music you have been listening
to during the processional and which you will be hearing more of later in the program is
being provided for us this afternoon by students from the School of Music’s wind ensemble,
under the direction of professor Timothy Salzman. As you can tell, they are gifted musicians
and we greatly appreciate their participation here today.
The ultimate responsibility for the University lies with the members of the Board of Regents,
ten citizens of the state who are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the state
senate. These dedicated men and women devote many hours each year to the welfare of the
University. Nine of our regents are with us this afternoon,
and I would like to introduce them at this time.
Please hold your applause until all are introduced. Patrick M. Shanahan, the Chair of the Board
Jeremy Jaech, Board Vice Chair William S. Ayer
Joel Benoliel Joanne Harrell
Vanessa Kritzer, the student member of the board
Constance W. Rice Rogelio Riojas
Herb Simon Please recognize our Board of Regents.
[ Applause ]. In addition to the regents, we have seated
on the platform this afternoon the chief academic and administrative officers of the University,
the vice presidents, the vice provosts, the deans of the schools and colleges, who will
be introduced in due course, faculty members, professors emeriti, the elected student leadership,
whom you will also meet a bit later, and other representatives from the various schools,
colleges, and departments of the University. We also have with us the chair of the faculty
senate, Norm Beauchamp, who represents one of the greatest faculties on the planet, of
which I am so proud to be a member. Northern? [Applause.]
I am also pleased to introduce Jeff Rochon, the president of our alumni association, which
has been keeping the over 400,000 members of the Husky alumni family connected with
each other and with the University for more than 125 years.
Thank you, Jeff. I would also like to recognize the many members
of the faculty serving today as commencement marshals. Their names are listed on page 7
of the commencement program. Finally, of great importance today are family
members who have been so instrumental in helping each of our graduates achieve the tremendous
distinction they will be awarded today. I would like all the mothers, all the fathers,
all the family members and friends who have supported you, please stand to receive our
thanks. [ Applause ].
They may not have always told you but they wouldn’t be here without you.
Graduates of the class of 2016� Congratulations! Today is the culmination of years of hard
work, not just your years here at the University of Washington but the years that have prepared
you to come here, to thrive here, to succeed here.
This is an incredible moment I urge you to savor it. Remember this feeling.
Don’t just take pictures of it. Remember this feeling.
You earned it through your effort, grit and determination. You have all triumphed over
obstacles that were in Your way and now you know something new about
yourself. You have the power to achieve something great
because you set your heart and your mind on it.
Each one of you is commencing a unique journey. We are waiting the world is waiting to see
what shape your journey takes. Will you teach the next generation of leaders? Will you seek
elected office? Will you write the great American novel or invent a piece of technology that
revolutionizes accessibility? Will you contribute your voice to movements for equity and justice?
Will you set a new standard for philanthropy? All of that potential, and infinitely more,
is here in this stadium today. Each of those unique journeys will have something
in common: you are all alumni of the University of Washington.
[ Applause ]. You are part of a huge family, THE Husky family
that spans the globe and every living generation. You and those hundreds of thousands of fellow
alumni all share something, something more than an affinity for purple clothing.
What I have underneath here. What you all have is a passion for possibility,
a passion for community and a passion for creating a world of good. You join a fellowship
united in the belief that together we WILL make a difference.
In fact, you’re already making a difference. I look at the difference you’re making, within
this class are 56 of the Husky 100. Among you are artists and organizers, educators
and inventors, poets and politicians. Some of you have challenged this University and
its leaders to reckon with inequity, and you did it because you know that this University
helps shape the world. Others among you have advanced scientific research in ways that
point to a bright future of boundless possibility. Whatever your passion, you took this opportunity
to pursue it. You seized this chance to learn about everything
from the farthest reaches of the universe to who you are and who you want to become.
You looked outside. You looked inside. As a public university, the UW has a special
duty to advance the public good. We succeed as teachers, as scholars, and as global citizens
when that duty is instilled in our graduates. As I reflect on this class,
As a public university, the UW has a special duty to advance the public good. We succeed
as teachers, as scholars, and as global citizens when that duty is instilled in our graduates.
As I reflect on this class, I know that we have succeeded. There is no group of new graduates
more prepared and more eager to go out and tackle the big challenges; no class better
able to understand that individual success goes handinhand with advancing the common
good. I challenge each of you to consider how you can personally give back, to your
city, your state, your country and your planet and to your university.
The University of Washington is forever changed for the better because each of you contributed
your talents and passions to this institution. You are the reason this University exists
and we are so proud of each of you. Thank you and congratulations to the Class
of 2016! And now I’d like to ask
Mustufa Jafry and Amber Valenzuela to present the class gift. Mustufa is receiving a Bachelor
of Science in Biochemistry with Full College Honors and a Bachelor of Arts in English with
Interdisciplinary Honors. Amber is graduating today with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication
and a minor in Diversity. Mustufa and Amber cochaired the Senior Class
Gift council and thanks to their leadership the senior class has made this wonderful early
start in philanthropy. Here’s Mustufa.>>Thank you. Good afternoon. Amber and I
had the pleasure of working with the Senior Class Gift leadership team and a phenomenal
volunteer team of seniors to organize this year’s Senior Class Gift campaign. It was
important for us to leave a legacy that represented the values of our class while enhancing the
University and providing a valuable resource for future generations of Huskies. Therefore,
with President Cauce’s important Race and Equity Initiative in mind, we decided to create
the Class of 2016 Impact and Diversity Scholarship as our Senior Class Gift.
>>This scholarship will give students the funding and tools needed to foster diversity
and affect change in the community. The diverse environment of UW shaped our time here but
there is much more we can do to raise awareness and celebrate diversity in our community.
Through this gift, students will be given the opportunity to become community builders
with the support of the Carlson Center and we look forward to seeing its impact on future
generations. It is with great pleasure that I announce
to you on the Seattle campus alone, we raised $44,373.60 in gifts and pledges.
[ Applause ]. And now, President Cauce, we will present
you with the names of all the donors. Thank you (A.
Thank you to all of you whose name is on here. I’ll read them all. Thank you so much. It’s
a little windy up here. This is kind of nice. The chief academic and chief budget officer
of the University is Provost Gerald Baldasty, who will present this year’s University award
winners.>>Each year the University presents awards
to honor outstanding teachers, mentors, programs, staff, and alumni. Many of this year’s award
winners are with us today on stage. You may read about these amazing people on pages eight
and nine of your program. I would like to draw particular attention
to those who have won awards for teaching and mentoring students.
Five University of Washington professors are winners of the University of Washington Distinguished
Teaching Award for 2016. They are Catherine Connors, professor and chair of classics,
Wendy Thomas, associate professor of bioengineering, Cole DeForest, assistant professor of chemical
engineering, Linda MartinMorris, principal lecturer in biology, and NyanPing Bi, senior
lecturer in Asian languages and literature. David Matsuda, lecturer in biomedical informatics
and medical education, is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award for Innovation
with Technology. The recipient of the Marsha Landolt Distinguished
Graduate Mentor Award is Sandra Silberstein, professor of English.
Two graduate students with teaching responsibilities have won excellence in teaching awards. They
are Jonathan Rosenberg, teaching assistant in philosophy, and Jorge Tomasevic, [ teaching
assistant in environmental and forest sciences. Four other award recipients also deserve special
mention: Joe P. Mahoney, professor of civil and environmental engineering, is the recipient
of the Distinguished Contributions to Lifelong Learning Award. Norm Beauchamp, professor
and chair of radiology, has received the David B. Thorud Leadership award for faculty. The
Distinguished Librarian Award recipient is Cassandra Hartnett, U.S. documents librarian
and gender, women & sexuality studies librarian. Ray Hilborn, professor of aquatic and fishery
sciences, has received this year’s University Faculty Lecture Award.
Greg Sheridan, senior associate vice president, University Advancement, is the winner of this
year’s Alumni Association Distinguished Service Award.
I would like all of our award winners to stand now and be acknowledged, both for their extraordinary
achievements and for their many contributions to this University.
[ Applause ].>>Since 1932, the University, in recognition
of extraordinary academic achievement, has presented a medal to the graduating senior
with the most distinguished academic record at the University. One medal is awarded to
a student who has completed at least threefourths of his or her degree requirements at the University
and one is awarded to a student who entered the University with at least 60 transfer credits
from a Washington community college. You’ve already met the first recipient,
Mustufa Abbas Jafry.Mustufa, will you come forward.
We like to see him stand here so you can see him blush.
Mustufa began participating in a research project in the biochemistry department at
the University of Washington when he was a senior in high school. As an undergraduate
he focused his educational pursuits on two seemingly unrelated fields. With an eye towards
becoming a physician, he wanted to understand the molecular and chemical processes that
underlie the functioning of the human body. But he also studied English and literature,
so that he might better use the power of language to improve access to healthcare for underserved
populations. He found time to cochair the Senior Gift Council
and cofound UW Reach, a student organization connecting prehealth students at the UW with
medically underserved communities in the Greater Seattle campus.
I’m really lucky to say we’re not losing Mustafa. He received a scholarship to attend the University
of Washington School of Medicine. (Applause).
He’s going to earn his doctor of medicine degree followed by a master’s degree in public
health or public policy. And his ultimate goal is to work as a physician caring for
underserved populations in the area. Let’s give him a round of applause.
The recipient of the President’s Medal for the student who entered the University from
a Washington community college is Forogh Bashizada. Sorry for the mispronunciation.
The path of learning that she has chosen is indelibly linked to her early life in wartorn
Afghanistan, where the Taliban, she tells us, decreed that girls were not worthy of
gaining an education. Fortunately, her family was able to immigrate to the United States
and during their initial tour of Seattle she found herself standing in Red Square with
her mother. She said, “I want to be a student here one
day.” She entered the University from Green River
Community College and her passion for reading led her to major in English. She also nurtured
her fascination with governmental systems and the law by taking classes that culminated
in a second major in political science. Her undergraduate research reflected this dual
major, as she analyzed the Afghan conflict from both a political and literary perspective.
Following graduation, She will intern as a CourtWatch monitor for
the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center. She plans on attending law school and becoming
a lawyer focused on refugees, immigrants and human rights.
Forogh is graduating summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and political
science. Forogh, it’s my very great pleasure to present
you this medal in recognition of your outstanding achievements at the University.
Now, are they rock stars or what? Our students are amazing! And I also urge you to look at
page 15 of the commencement program. It recognizes those students who graduated today with the
highest honors Summa cum laude, magna cum laude, and cum
laude. Congratulations to all of you.
Students here get a rich education inside and outside the classroom.
Student government is an important component of the governance of this institution, and
its leadership is called on regularly to represent student views on a wide range of issues at
the University. I am pleased to introduce to you now the President of the Associated
Students of the University of Washington, Tyler Wu, and the President of the Graduate
and Professional Student Senate, Alex Bolton. [ Applause ].>>Hello and congratulations to the graduating
class of 2016. My name is Tyler Wu and I have had the honor
of serving as your ASUW Student Body President this past year. I wanted to first give a shoutout
to all of the people who didn’t think I would be up here speaking to you all today,
Including my mom who owes me 20 bucks now. Speaking of family I also wanted to acknowledge
my amazing team who I worked with this year, and whose family photos are behind me on the
screen. Now, when I initially was writing this speech,
I tried to think of what I would want to hear if I was sitting on the field with you all.
What could I say in three minutes that would change your life forever?
And then I thought to myself, these. People are sitting here for three hours so
what can I do to make this entertaining. Then I started sending emails asking role models
is there’s anything they want to say to the graduating class of 2016. Response rate was
too high. Beyonce and Obama were to busy running the world
and dubs is a dog.
However, one person managed to send a reply. Not only have I taken his advice on numerous
occasions, but he could Be described as very, very attractive. You
can be the judge of that. Here’s what he sent in. You’re wondering why did I send a video
of myself. This next phase for a lot of us is unknown and in the face of unknown you
need to be a number one supporter, trust yourself and take your own advice.>>As you walk across this stage, you
thanks As you walk across this stage, you have to
acknowledge the fact that not many people have the same opportunity as you do.
And, yes, there have been many people along the way who have helped you get here. But
ultimately the all nighters and waking up at 7:00 a.m. to register for courses were
things that YOU had to hurdle to get here. Don’t get me wrong, as the first person in
my family to graduate from college I look out into this crowd and see my friends, family,
and mentors who have helped me through this challenging journey. But at the end of the
day we are our biggest supporters and we have to remember to celebrate that.
Look to those who have supported you and thank them for what they have done, but also give
yourself a pat on the back because you are graduating from one of the best universities
in the world. Graduating from this institution is a privilege, and this college experience
has prepared you for the next chapter in your lives.
We all will go on to do some amazing Things, but for right now I’d like all the
graduates to stand up and give a round of applause to not only your supporters here
but to you as well. Please, stand up with me.
[ Applause ]. Thank you all for the standing ovations. Thank
you all and go Dawgs! Hello dog fans. My name is Alex bolt on, I’m
the president of the graduate professional student Senate. I have the honor today of
graduating from UW school of law. Today is a great day for celebration. Not just celebrating
the graduates. Today is about celebrating those of you in the stands. Without you in
the stands, those of us on the field in this hallowed stadium wouldn’t be able to celebrate
this great achievement and fulfillment of our dreams. We thank you for your support,
your inspiration and your belief in us. Today is also a great day to celebrate this
state. This institution is here today because the
founders of this then territory and now state and generations of the citizens of Washington
is invested in this university to make it a great public university that it is. So let’s
celebrate Washington citizens helped us get here. Today is also a day to celebrate UDub
and its greatness. I worry that greatness is taken for granted. UW is great. Has been
great as long as most people can remember. If we take it for granted, bad things can
happen. That greatness is not the result of happenstance. That greatness is a result of
work, hard work, by faculty, staff, students administrators, day after day after day decade
after decade after decade. And again if we take that greatness for granted,
the worst thing that can happen is we end up like that quack school 300�miles south.
Now this institution is important to me. Not just because of its excellence. Because
of how it provides access to excellence. While all these great things are going on,
we’re entering interesting times as a country. While some blame institutions for the ills
of society and holding people down, I can tell you that this institution has provided
a lot more and all of us here in the field. I see institutions as a vital social infrastructure
that we need in order to reach our full potential and lift ourselves up. This institution allowed
this kid from a trailer park a few miles west of Idaho to attend his dream school. This
institution allowed this kid who received a state need grant to serve on the Board of
Regents. This institution allowed this kid whose parents are a maid and disabled veteran
to attend one of the nation’s top law schools. Because this institution has done so much
for all of us, we have a responsibility to keep the doors open behind us.
In order to do so, we need to give back. Now, there’s a lot of ways you can give back. You
can donate. You can join the alumni association. You get purple Husky plates to show your Husky
pride. You get involved with impact. Let legislators know that UDub matters to you and it better
to them as well. You can wear purple on Fridays and come back to campus and root on the Dawgs,
on the field, on the course, on the court, on the track and on the water.
Now let’s go celebrate. Let’s celebrate our achievements. Let’s celebrate our friends
and family. Let’s celebrate this great institution. Let’s go show the world what Huskies can do.
See you in Pasadena. Go Dawgs! [Applause.] Thank you, Tyler and Alex. It really has been
an incredible privilege, honor and pleasure for me to work with both ever them so closely
this year. They have done a lot to make this university a better place. One more time Let’s
applaud them. [Applause.]>>We are honored to have with us today a
true citizen of the world, a renaissance man whose life has spanned international borders
and enriched the lives of people across the planet. For 17 years Mark Pigott was the Chief
Executive Officer of PACCAR, a global technology and transportation company. His remarkable
success in business has been matched by his personal engagement with and generous support
of institutions of higher learning, libraries, and the arts, both in the United States and
abroad. In recognition of Mr. Piggott’s extraordinary
achievements, the University is today conferring upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters. The honorary degree citation will be read
by Regent Patrick Shanahan. Would Mr. Piggott and Mr. Shanahan please join me at the lectern.
[ Applause ]. Mark Charles Pigott, in your life the four
worlds of family, commerce, education and the arts have joined as one and you have orchestrated
their confluence with a masterful touch. As the fourth generation of your family to
lead PACCAR, a truly historic American and now global company, founded over a century
ago by your greatgrandfather, you have taken the storied legacy of your forebears and raised
it, through visionary leadership, technological innovation, and an unwavering demand for quality,
to new heights. PACCAR is the original Seattlebased technology company and today is one of the
world’s leading global technology and transportation companies. It has set the industry standard
for vehicle design and safety, while making environmental stewardship a central tenet
of its enterprise. For six consecutive years Forbes magazine ranked you among the top 10
CEOs in North America and in 2009 the Harvard Business Review named you as one of the top
50 CEOs in the world. You are deeply committed to improving the
lives of people in your own community and abroad. Your quiet philanthropy has been highlighted
by its enormous generosity and your caring and personal engagement. You have supported
educational pursuits around the globe, volunteered your time teaching business students at the
UW and abroad, and helped countless others achieve their dreams. On the University of
Washington campus, PACCAR Hall, together with the faculty endowments in engineering, business,
arts, information technology, humanities and athletics, as well as the diversity scholarships
you have established, give testimony to your commitment to the public promise of the University
of Washington. You have said, Everything revolves around
libraries, and your steadfast support has enabled the preservation of historic materials
in major world libraries as well as those in smaller communities. Your generosity has
ensured that future scholars will share in a vital cultural legacy.
Inspired by a true passion for the arts and history, you have long served as a key benefactor
for the Royal Shakespeare Company America and in England. You helped restore St. Paul’s
Cathedral in London, and established the Pigott Education Center at London’s National Gallery,
which welcomes more than 80,000 school children annually. Your tireless involvement with our
University’s Burke Museum of Natural History and The Henry Art Gallery has made innovative
exhibits possible for the benefit of thousands in our community.
In recognition of your good works and service to humanity, the nations of Belgium, Hungary,
Italy, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom have bestowed upon you their most prestigious
honorary titles. In 2012, you were awarded the title of Honorary Knight Commander of
the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for your role in strengthening business and
cultural ties between the United States and the United Kingdom.
For opening the doors of educational opportunity to countless students around the world, for
your dedication to preserving the accumulated knowledge and artistic expression of humankind,
for instilling social responsibility as a core value of your industry worldwide, and
for being a true and compassionate friend of this institution, the University of Washington
is proud to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa.
Come on, this is just a little bit of liquid sunshine. We’re from Seattle. hey.
>>We are honored to have as our Commencement speaker today U.S. Secretary of the Interior
and former University of Washington regent Sally Jewell. She is also an alumna of the
University of Washington, having graduated in 1978 with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical
engineering. Our speaker started her career with
When we say University of Washington graduates can go anywhere, she is the perfect example.
>>>Hey Dawgs, how is it going? Is the rain going to stop? What do we think? Thank you,
president Cauce for that warm introduction. Thank you incredible faculty, staff, administrators,
for this amazing institution for the wisdom and the scholarship that you infuse in all
of these great students. And to the regents, the families, the friends
and especially to the class of 2016, it 12 truly an honor to be recognized by the University
of Washington as your commencement speaker today.
Because this school this community has given me so much over the years. Like purple clothing.
Lots of purple clothing. Like a paycheck. That’s right. University
paid me� are you ready? A whopping $1.98�an hour back in 1973 to serve burgers in the
dorm cafeteria. We called them hockey pucks. I later upgraded for the same wage to rent
out canoes at the canoe house long before it became the waterfront activity center.
I got a husband. Believe it or not. Warren and I met here our freshman year. Our relationship
started as all good relationships should, the Internet hadn’t been invented yet. At
a party on the third floor of Haggett hall. Yeah! And yes, I got a world class education.
What I learned here at the UDub has opened incredible doors for me in the 38 years since
I sat in the same chairs that you do now. And I know around campus there are actually
exactly the same chairs that I sat in. By education, I’m not talking about having learned
how to prevent marine corrosion or how to understand the nuances of the internal combustion
engine. Although that did come in handy when I put 15,000�miles on Fiat back in 1977,
my last chance to take a road trip before entering the real world. But more importantly,
the UW taught me how to think. How to approach complex issues. How to speak up when something
just didn’t seem right. And how to find solutions. And it’s those
lessons that have been invaluable. The education that I received here and that you just received
here, whether you’re an undergraduate or a graduate student will be foundational to anything
that you do next. So about that, what is next for you? I imagine
that’s a question you’ve been getting a lot lately. As it happens, it’s a question I’ve
been getting a lot lately too. You see, it turns out there’s this thing called
the 22nd�amendment which limits the president to two terms. So come January�20th President
Obama and I are out of jobs. So what’s next? All right, here’s how I answer
that question. I have no idea. You’re welcome to borrow that for yourself.
It’s sure to be a real winner with your parents. But I want to explain to you why “I have no
idea” can a perfectly great answer. And the first thing is to be open to new paths. If
you were to look at my high school yearbook, Renton high school class of 1973� I figured
there would be some Renton Indians out there� you find that I aspired to be a dental hygienist.
A noble profession. One we all rely on. But that plan did not work out so well. Once I
got to the UDub, I found that Warren’s engineering homework looked a lot more interesting than
mine. And so I switched to mechanical engineering. Few MEs out there, too. During school I landed
a job working for General Electric building components for the Alaska pipeline. Solving
little problems like how do you insulate a pipe that expands when you put hot oil in
it? After graduation, my degree took me to the old oil fields of southern Oklahoma where
I tried to solve puzzles like how do you increase production from an oil field that’s been going
since World War I? As you know, I didn’t stay in the oil and gas business forever. Seattle
called me home. The chance to raise a family near my family. The lure of the great outdoors
close by. A filing that the place feeling that the place
was more important to us at that time than the career. So I accepted the first job offer
I got. At a bank. That’s where I used my experience to help
figure out whether certain loans to natural resource companies added up or whether it
didn’t and it funder out a lot of them didn’t which ended up being really good for my career.
I learned quickly it’s always better to let other banks make loans that don’t get paid
back. My banking career and my time spent in organizations like mountain trust board
making sure I90 didn’t look like I5 with development that spanned every intersection across our
beautiful Cascades eventually led me to a job with REI and eventually led me to a call
from the President of the United States to serve on his cabinet. I’m skipping a few steps
in here, obviously. But my point is this: If I would have been dead set on my path from
day one, dental hygiene or bust, I would have missed out on so many interesting careers,
challenges, and experiences. And similarly, if I would have said in my high school yearbook
that I want to be secretary of the interior one day� and by the way, I’d love it if
any high schooler has ever said that� I would have missed out on the amazing zigs
and zags of my career and I’m quite sure I would not be at the podium speaking to you
as secretary of the interior. So whether you’ve got a job lined up starting next week or whether
you truly have no idea of what’s next, I encourage you to be open to the zigs and zags of your
own path. One of the great joys I get in this job is being out in our nation’s public lands
and meeting people who are committed to so thoughtfully caring for them. Sometimes the
visits can be really fun like yesterday when I was you at Mount Rainier National Park with
staff and we were treated to peek aboos as the clouds went. It can be difficult. Meeting
with community members who disagree with how our public lands are being managed. Or dealing
with an armed takeover of a wildlife refuge as happened earlier in Oregon this year. The
world is complex. And I learned very quickly that there are no no brainers in this work.
Everything is a brainer. But there’s also huge rewards and opportunities to do some
amazing things. Like when I was a few months into this new gig and we were reviewing repairs
to Super Storm Sandy trying to get Statue of Liberty open for the 4th of July. I pointed
to Lady Liberty’s torch and said can we go up there? And the park ranger looked at me
seriously and said, “Ma’am, you can go anywhere you want.”
So that was neat. As was a meeting just a few weeks ago with the nation’s oldest native
chief from the black feet nation in Montana who gave me a new name. Sounds like there’s
in Blackfeet out there. Congratulations, he gave me a new name. “Far away woman” a name
that might ring true with my husband Warren given the amount of travel I have in this
job, but it was very meaningful to me and I did get to spend a night in the submarine
under the Arctic pack ice but that’s a whole different story. I’ve learned you need to
do some of the fun stuff to make up for some of the really stressful stuff. There’s a fair
amount of that to go around. Which brings me to my next piece of advice for you which
is help, be part of the solution. This world all of its gloom and all of its glory needs
your help. There’s no shortage of complex issues. The hairiest of hair balls. That unfortunately,
won’t be resolved by the time you get your diploma here in just a few minutes. But you
can barely turn on the TV without seeing someone offering up short sound bite solutions to
some of our most trying challenges. Highlighting controversy and challenging those with opposing
views might boost ratings and help fill the 24hour news airwaves but they won’t solve
the problems plaguing our planet. Every day I have to juggle competing interests
and consider the tradeoffs. Take energy development for example.
As a nation we’ve evolved tremendously in our production and our use of energy. From
the data centers of unfettered pollution at any price to power must to being smarter about
how we develop in the right ways in the right places to look at large landscapes more holistically
because everything we do has impacts and tradeoffs. Hydropower was and is critical to development
of the Pacific Northwest and the entire west frankly. But we now know better. The impacts
of development on salmon populations that once swam up these rivers in droves that were
so important to the indigenous people of the region. We have a much better understanding,
too, of the impacts of coal development on our streams and our atmosphere.
We’ve seen what footprint oil and gas development can leave on landscapes. And how devastating
it can be to workers, wildlife and local communities if there’s an accident offshore as happened
in 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. And even renewable energy like wind and solar has impacts.
One Senator I work with likes to call wind projects giant Quisinarts in the sky for what
can happen in a bird or bat tries to flew through a wind farm. Migrating water foul
can mistake large solar arrays in the desert for lakes landing and being unable to take
off. So nothing is simple. Nothing is free. And yet we need energy to fuel the cars, light
rail, the buses that brought you here today. To turn on the stadium lights at Husky games.
To power that smartphone that we rely on whether it’s 20 consult the ubiquitous Wikipedia although
none of you who have used that as research in of course. To Snapchat with your friends
like a few of you might be doing this minute. How we power our world essential to lifting
people around the world out of poverty while reducing our consumption and ensuring we’re
doing everything we can to stop climate change is one of the most pressing issues of our
day. Recognizing that our decisions also have impacts
on the lives and livelihoods of people has to be taken into account. So this won’t be
solved on my watch. I got seven months and a few days to go. Although we’ve made great
progress. Nor will it be solved by oversimplifying the situation or thinking it can be resolved
overnight with a flip of a switch as we replace one resource with another. It’s not that easy.
And with the education you’ve been blessed to receive at the Udub comes the great responsibility
of challenging those who believe the world is as simple as yes or no, black or white.
It’s going to continue to take the best and brightest minds to develop safer, cleaner
and less impactful ways to power our world while appreciating the importance of the ecological,
cultural, and spiritual benefits we get from our lands and waters.
It’s going to take nurturing future generations to appreciate nature, exposing them to the
world’s best classroom. The one with no walls. We need you, the best and brightest minds
in law, in public service, in education, in science, in medicine, in business, in art,
in communications, in understanding the human dimension to tackle this and many other big
issues like income inequality. Like unsustainable development or illegal trafficking from drugs
to humans to endangered wildlife and the global spread of disease to name just a few.
It’s easy to stand on the sidelines and shout suggestions but we will solve more when we
come together and work for the common good, for the commons.
I spent four decades in the private sector, but the last 3 1/2 years in public service
have been the most rewarding of my life. And I encourage you to consider a career of the
same. The only office I ever ran for was to serve
as student body secretary in my high school. I won by a landslide. But I certainly never
thought that I would serve as secretary in the president’s cabinet.
I found there’s no greater calling than public service and the world needs you. Now more
than ever before. So my last piece of advice is to stay balanced. A mentor of mine, diehard
Husky, norm regent now in his 90s Jim Ellis once told me that he every deferred to divide
his life into thirds, a third for home, a third for work, and a third for community.
I continue to strive to follow his advice. There have been points in my life when it’s
been hard to find and keep this balance. Times when work has taken me away from home
for long stretches or when I haven’t been able to give back to my community in the way
that I want to. So in that spirit, I do have some idea of
what I’m doing next and it has to do with regaining some of that balance. Come January,
Warren and I are going to jump into our Prius and take a long slow road trip back from Washington,
D.C., to the best Washington. Washington State. [cheers and applause]
During which we plan to spend some quality time visiting our nation’s public treasures,
we want to satisfy Warren’s flying bug and check out the Wright brothers memorial and
the Tuskegee memorial. Maybe see the cranes at the international wildlife refuge in New
Mexico. Explore the slot canyon in Utah and Arizona and spend time in Indian country appreciating
our nation’s rich indigenous culture. So whether you agree with the exact rule of
thirds or whether you find your own particular magic balance, I encourage you to understand
what makes you tick. And then strive, strive, strive to infuse that meaning into your life
at all times. You grew up in a world that is hyper connected and always on. So put down
your tablets for a while. Not forever, and pick up a hobby. Volunteer, be a mentor, take
a hike. You’re blessed to still have your parents. Call your father. Call your mother.
Actually, always call your mother. Whatever it is you do, I imagine you’ll find it’s the
activities and the relationships that you make outside of work that truly make your
life three dimensional. And along the way, don’t forget to take care of yourself. Exercise,
drink water. Make time for nature. Walk in the rain.
And don’t let time pass you by without having fulfilled some of your greatest desires.
Travel while you’re young and able for you’ll never fore regret what you did but one day
you might look back and regret what you didn’t do. You are the best and brightest. You are.
You’re all important parts of the solution. And I am very optimistic as I look out into
this audience about our future. So I’m going to go close by making a few amendments
to my suggested answer I gave earlier on the “what are you doing next” question. I have
no idea still a great answer. As long as it’s followed up with but I’m going to be open
to new paths. I’m going to be part of the solution and I’m going to infuse my path with
meaning and balance. Pretty simple, right? Congratulations on your graduation. It is
great to be a Husky. Good luck to each and every one of you. Thank you and go Dawgs!
[ Applause ] Not only did she inspire us but she made the
sun come out! U.S. Secretary of Interior and former University of Washington regent Sally
Jewell has had a lot of firsts in her life but this is a first for our university. Because
our commencement speaker is also being honored today with the highest award bestowed by the
University of Washington alumni association on one of its graduates. The alumna summa
dignata award which means alumni worthy of the highest praise. You just listened to her.
You know why. (Applause).
I want to repeat. If you want to know where University of Washington’s degree can take
you, honorable Jewell and honorable Piggott, you can do anything you want.
[Applause.] All right. The moment that many of you have
been waiting to, we will now begin to confer degrees.
>>Ladies and gentlemen, we are now ready to present the various degrees to all candidates.
Degrees will be conferred by the chair of the Board of Regents, Patrick Shanahan. The
audience is requested to remain in their seats until the conclusion of today’s ceremony.
Candidates for doctoral degrees will be presented by the several deans. For the School of Medicine,
Vice Dean Suzanne Allen.>>Madam President, it is an honor to recommend
the 202 candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Many of these graduates have
proceeded to graduate training positions throughout the country. Those participating in today’s
ceremony will come forward with the other doctoral candidates.
Dean Joel Berg, School of Dentistry.>>Madam President, it is my pleasure to present
the candidates for Doctor of Dental Surgery. These candidates were honored previously in
separate ceremonies. The present candidates will please come forward with the other doctoral
candidates. Senior Associate Dean Mary Hotchkiss, School
of Law.>>Madam President, on behalf of the faculty
of law, I have the honor of presenting the 153 candidates for the degree of Juris Doctor.
The law graduates participating in this ceremony will come forward with the other doctoral
candidates.>>Dean Sean Sullivan, School of Pharmacy.
>>Madam President, it is my honor to present the 96 candidates for the degree of Doctor
of Pharmacy. These candidates will please come forward with the other doctoral candidates.
>>Dean David Eaton of the Graduate School.>>Madam President, here with us today are
candidates who have completed all requirements for the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor
of Education, Doctor of Musical Arts, Doctor of Physical Therapy, Doctor of Audiology,
and Doctor of Nursing Practice. On behalf of the deans of the schools and colleges and
the graduate faculty, I am pleased and honored to recommend these candidates for the highest
degrees awarded by the University of Washington.>>Will all the doctoral degree candidates
from all schools and colleges please rise.>>It is my distinct pleasure to present you,
Regent Shanahan, all of the doctoral degree candidates from the schools and colleges just
presented.>>On behalf of the Board of Regents and the
faculties of the respective schools, I am pleased to confer upon these candidates their
respective doctoral degrees. Congratulations. You have achieved high academic distinction,
and this University salutes you. You will be presented today with a memento of this
graduation exercise. Please come forward.
[names being announced]>>Candidates for master’s degrees will be
presented by Dean Sandra Archibald of the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy and Governance
and Dean Eaton of the Graduate School.>>Will Candidates for master’s degrees in
the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance will please rise.
Madam President I am honored to present these candidates to receive their respective master’s
degrees. Candidates will please remain standing.>>Candidates for the various master’s degrees
for all schools and colleges will please rise. Madam President, on behalf of the deans of
the schools and colleges and the graduate faculty, I am honored to present these candidates
to receive their respective master’s degrees.>>It is my distinct honor to present to you,
Regent Shanahan, all of the master’s degree candidates from the various schools and colleges.
>>We’re getting pretty good at this. On behalf of the Board of Regents and the graduate faculty,
I am pleased to confer upon each of you your master’s degree. Congratulations. You will
be presented today with a memento of this graduation exercise.
Please come forward.>>Candidates for bachelor’s degrees in the
various colleges and schools of the University will be presented by the several deans. The
candidates who have been accepted by the general faculty of the University for their respective
degrees are listed in the commencement program. For the College of Arts and Sciences, Dean
Robert Stacey.>>Candidates from the College of Arts and
Sciences will please rise. [ Applause ]. Madam President, it is my honor to present
these candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of
Design, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Science and to recommend that they be awarded
their respective degrees. Candidates will please be seated.
>>Dean Mia Tuan, College of Education.>>Will candidates from the College of Education
please rise. Madam President, I am proud to present these
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood and Family Studies and
to recommend that they be awarded their degrees. Please be seated.
>>Dean Michael Bragg, College of Engineering.>>Will candidates from the College of Engineering please rise.
Madam President, I am pleased to present these candidates of the College of Engineering for
the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Engineering, Bachelor of Science
in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil
and Environmental Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Human Centered Design
and Engineering, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Mechanical
Engineering, and to recommend that they be awarded their respective degrees.
Candidates will please be seated.>>Dean Lisa Graumlich, College of the Environment.
>>The candidates from the College of the Environment will please rise.
Madam President, it is my pleasure and honor to present these candidates of the College
of the Environment for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of
Science in Forest Resources, and Bachelor of Science in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences,
and to recommend that they be awarded their respective degrees.
Candidates will please be seated.>>Dean Harry Bruce, the Information School.
>>Candidates from the Information School will please rise.
It gives me great pleasure, Madam President, to present the candidates of the Information
School for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Informatics and to recommend that they
be awarded their bachelor’s degrees. Candidates will please be seated.
>>Dean James Jiambalvo, Michael G. Foster School of Business.
>>Will the candidates from the Michael G. Foster School of Business please rise.
Madam President, it is with much pleasure that I present these candidates for bachelor’s
degrees in the Foster School of Business and recommend that they be awarded their respective
bachelor’s degrees. Candidates will please be seated.
>>Dean Azita Emami, school of Nursing.>>The candidates for the degrees from the number one ranked school
of nursing in the nation will please rise. Madam President, it is my pleasure and honor
to present these candidates to you for
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing and recommend that they be awarded their bachelor’s
degrees. Candidates will please be seated.
>>Vice Dean Suzanne Allen, School of Medicine.>>Will the bachelor candidates from the School of Medicine please rise.
Madam President, it is a privilege to present these bachelor candidates from the School
of Medicine in the specialized fields of medical technology, prosthetics and orthotics, and
physician’s assistant and to recommend they be awarded their respective bachelor’s degrees.
Candidates will please be seated.>>Dean John Schaufelberger, College of Built
Environments.>>Will the candidates from the College of
Built Environments please rise. Madam President, I have the honor to present
these candidates for bachelor’s degrees in Architecture, Urban Planning, Landscape Architecture,
Construction Management, and Community and Environmental Planning, and to recommend that
they be awarded their respective bachelor’s degrees.
Candidates will please be seated.>>Dean Edwina Uehara, School of Social Work.
>>Distinguished candidates from the School of Social Work, please rise.
Madam President, on behalf of the social work faculty, it is my great privilege to present
these candidates for their bachelor’s degrees in Social Welfare and to recommend that they
be awarded their respective bachelor’s degrees.>>Dean Howard Frumkin, School of Public Health.
>>Will the candidates from the School of Public Health please rise.
Madam President, it is with much pleasure and pride that I present these candidates
for bachelor’s degrees in the School of Public Health and recommend that they be awarded
their respective degrees. Candidates will please be seated.
>>All bachelor candidates from all schools and colleges just presented will please rise.
Following regent Shanahan citation awarding the various bachelor degrees, all candidates
will be seated immediately. And under direction of the faculty Marshals will await their turn to come forward one row at a time.
>>It is my distinct honor and privilege to present to you, Regent Shanahan, all of the
bachelor’s degree candidates from the various schools and colleges.
>>On behalf of the Board of Regents and the faculty of the University, I am pleased to
confer upon each of you your bachelor’s degree. Congratulations.
Please come forward as directed by the Marshals.>>The University of Washington Men’s Glee
Club, under the direction of Jeffrey Larkin, will now lead us in the singing of Rise Up
with Pride for Washington. The words to the song are printed on the inside
of the back cover of the commencement program. The audience will please rise. Rise up with pride for Washington For purple and for gold
From far and wide we meet as one As Huskies proud and bold Washington we hail to thee Honor, truth, integrity
Forever shine from lake to shore Your light upon us ever more Rise up with pride for Washington Together hand in hand
We will proclaim our loyalty In song throughout the land.
Washington we hail to thee Honor, truth, integrity
Forever shine from lake to shore Your light upon us ever more>>The audience and members of the graduating class are requested to remain at their seats until the
recessional of the faculty is concluded. Once the stage party has left the stadium, graduates
may exit the field via the stairs at the west end of the stadium or to the east as you entered.
Please remain at your seats soaking up the liquid sunshine until the recessional is over.
The one hundred fortyfirst commencement exercises of the University of Washington are now closed.
[cheers and applause]

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